What is Octave?

In the previous lesson, we have learned about relationship between notes and frequencies. Also we know that when we pass a G note we come to an A note and loop forever. Octave is a group of 12 notes representing one loop. However, octaves are groups of notes starting with a C note. When you pass a B note and start an C note, you come to another octave. Additionally, octave of a note can be represented as a number near the note symbol like A1. Note that octave frequencies are multiples of the first octave frequency.

Here is an extended note-frequency table showing multiple octaves:

Octave 1 (Hz) Octave 2 (Hz) Octave 3 (Hz)
C1 33 C2 65 C3 131
C#1 / Db1 35 C#2 / Db2 69 C#3 / Db3 139
D1 37 D2 73 D3 147
D#1 / Eb1 39 D#2 / Eb2 78 D#3 / Eb3 156
E1 41 E2 82 E3 165
F1 44 F2 87 F3 175
F#1 / Gb1 46 F#2 / Gb2 92 F#3 / Gb3 185
G1 49 G2 98 G3 196
G1 / Ab1 52 G2 / Ab2 104 G3 / Ab3 208
A1 55 A2 110 A3 120
A#1 / Bb1 58 A#2 / Bb2 117 A#3 / Bb3 233
B1 62 B2 123 B3 247

Piano Notes

Here is the octave notes on a piano. Black keys are always sharp(#) / bemol(b) notes. However, we generally use sharp(#) for display.

Guitar Notes

Generally on paper, guitar fingerboard is displayed from top so that the thickest string remains at the bottom.

On myChordBook, first 8 frets on guitar fingerboard are used. Note that left-most notes represent open-string notes, which are the notes that you play strings without putting your finger on the fingerboard.

Ukulele Notes

Generally on paper, ukulele fingerboard is displayed from top so that the thickest string remains at the bottom.

On myChordBook, first 5 frets on ukulele fingerboard are used. Note that left-most notes represent open-string notes, which are the notes that you play strings without putting your finger on the fingerboard.